High energy pulses from a wavelength tunable Dy:ZBLAN mid-infrared fiber laser

M. R. Majewski, R. I. Woodward, S. D. Jackson: High energy pulses from a wavelength tunable Dy:ZBLAN mid-infrared fiber laser. CLEO Europe:2019, OSA Technical Digest, The Optical Society, Munich, Germany, 2019, (Paper CJ-5.3).

Abstract

Laser sources in the mid-infrared (MIR 3 - 5 μm) are increasingly in demand to meet the needs of a variety of applications which exploit the strong ro-vibrational molecular absorption lines in this spectral region. Requirement of high energy pulsed light is found in time-resolved sensing applications such as LIDAR. Fiber lasers in the midinfrared are promising candidates for generating such pulses, with Q-switched erbium-doped systems demonstrated covering both the 2.8 μm and 3.5 μm bands. However, there remains a sizable ‘gap’ in spectral coverage of such lasers, motivating interest in pursuing alternative rare earth dopants. Dysprosium in particular is a compelling solution, as it possesses a wide gain bandwidth covering 2.8 to 3.4 μm with recent electronically tunable systems closing much of this ‘gap’.

BibTeX (Download)

@conference{Majewski2019b,
title = {High energy pulses from a wavelength tunable Dy:ZBLAN mid-infrared fiber laser},
author = {M. R. Majewski and R. I. Woodward and S. D. Jackson},
url = {http://www.riwoodward.com/publication_files/majewski_2019_cleo_qs.pdf
https://www.osapublishing.org/abstract.cfm?uri=cleo_europe-2019-cj_5_3},
year  = {2019},
date = {2019-07-01},
booktitle = {CLEO Europe:2019, OSA Technical Digest},
publisher = {The Optical Society},
address = {Munich, Germany},
abstract = {Laser sources in the mid-infrared (MIR 3 - 5 μm) are increasingly in demand to meet the needs of a variety of applications which exploit the strong ro-vibrational molecular absorption lines in this spectral region. Requirement of high energy pulsed light is found in time-resolved sensing applications such as LIDAR. Fiber lasers in the midinfrared are promising candidates for generating such pulses, with Q-switched erbium-doped systems demonstrated covering both the 2.8 μm and 3.5 μm bands. However, there remains a sizable ‘gap’ in spectral coverage of such lasers, motivating interest in pursuing alternative rare earth dopants. Dysprosium in particular is a compelling solution, as it possesses a wide gain bandwidth covering 2.8 to 3.4 μm with recent electronically tunable systems closing much of this ‘gap’.},
note = {Paper CJ-5.3},
keywords = {fibre laser},
pubstate = {published},
tppubtype = {conference}
}